Montreux-Oberland Bahn

Everything and Anything

betterbooktitles:

Peter Shaffer: Equus
Reader Submission: Title by Meg Harvey, redesign by Ben Griffin.

Fifty shades of neigh

betterbooktitles:

Peter Shaffer: Equus

Reader Submission: Title by Meg Harvey, redesign by Ben Griffin.

Fifty shades of neigh

queenspiration:

15+ lovely ideas for growing succulents

One day I’ll finally buy the succulent of my dreams…

(via mydiytodolist)

descouleurs:

Fruit Infused Coconut Water



Move over vodka, say hello to infused coconut water

descouleurs:

Fruit Infused Coconut Water

Move over vodka, say hello to infused coconut water

(via mydiytodolist)

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

Peaches roasted to sweet perfection paired with creamy coconut milk for a decadent dairy-and-sugar-free summer treat! Click HERE for the recipe.

Yummy Popsicles

(via mydiytodolist)

nevver:


Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck


Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

nevver:

Six Tips on Writing from John Steinbeck

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
i’m ready for summerrrr

i’m ready for summerrrr

(Source: shesherowngod, via -everythinginbetween)

chevron friendship bracelet rug via The House That Lars Built

Must do

(via craftgasms)

"the council of war" (Taken with instagram) View high resolution

"the council of war" (Taken with instagram)

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